Home Provincial - Decorating

Provincial - Decorating

How To Recreate A 17th Century French Provence Chateau Look In Your Own Home – Part 2

Here we see a new picture of the hallway from a different angle.  Bright yellow has always been a staple color for country French decorating.  Look how the trim is painted in a greenish gray tone.  White is used on the shutters while the walls feature a deep hue of yellow.  Linen drapes hang on the wall, where an antique bench sits with a white cushion.

Borrow some of these Provence elements of this home for yourself.

If you are looking for great set of candlesticks, check out Jack’s Candle Stands from IMAX.

The candlesticks are made of turned aluminum and finished in black sheen.  The candlesticks have a wonderful footed design with incredible shape.  The set of three feature graduating sizes, and would look terrific paired together for an impacting statement.  The dimensions of the candlesticks are 14-20H x 4.75-5.25D and have been discounted to $96 dollars from $175.

Candlesticks sold in sets should always be positioned together for a dramatic statement.  Place them on a bed stand ,console table or any where you need a punch of design.  Add ornate candle sticks in your home to get that primitive feel amongst your modern conveniences.

 

Commode – Moissonnier Furniture

Other Provence Decor Considerations:

-Buy this set for only $90 Dollars!  3Pc finial set – stone grey & gold leaf

-Thus Foreside prosecco pitcher, certainly looks Provincial!  By Foreside $34

-Make floral arrangements from this lovely set of three round bowl with Feet – Antique Silver Finish $30.  Use it as a candy bowl or to dress up your bathroom.  Store soaps or face cloths for guests.

-America Retold sells a set of 6 dish with cloche Set For $87

-America Retold sells this trophy centerpiece perfect for the center of the table.

– Decorate with this lovely planter which features and antique style garden chicken wire cloche for $32

-The Apollo pedestal is a great distressed stand perfect for an over-sized urn.  Sit it in front of a mirror or a window or at the end of a hallway.  This stand sells for $259

-This Lester Iron Glass Bar Cart is the perfect cart to display your dishware that is too nice to sit behind cabinet doors.  Stack your white table ware and wine glasses on for the perfect display of all your silver and glass accessories.

-Buy this Copperplated Revere Bowl for a centerpiece for $53.00

-Currey and Company Provencial White 4 Light Chandelier sells for $985 Currey and Company has a number of alternatives in this same style.

-These dentiled Platinum Chargers have a period flare.  This set of 4 sells for $23.60.  It is easy to collect, when the price point is so affordable!

-This medium metal cloche makes a great decorating piece for a counter or bathroom bookshelf.  It is for sale for $30

-This terrific console table has so much potential.  It can be painted and distressed to match your interior.  It features terrific detail and is one of the nicest demilunes on Amazon.  Universal Lighting And Decor sells this table for $329

-Decorate the outside of your home with this painted old fashioned watering can, sold for $53

-Imax sells this set of 5 candle-holders that have great painted patina for just over $100.  Imax also sells this set of 5 candle-holder set in rustic wood for $138.  Split them up into different rooms of your home.

-Hang this mini pot holder above your kitchen sink.  It has a metal finish, which fits perfectly into the Provincial decorating scheme.  It is only $20 dollars

-You will adore this lovely set of mini lion bowls.  The set of 6 sells for $10.99

-This topiary two tier large planter is a great planter to line up in a row outside your home.  This great planter sells for $40 dollars

Rustic Provence Decorating Ideas- Mr Aurélien Deleuze and his wife, Pascale Own This Captivating Chateau in France

In this photograph, you can see a closer look at the Pavé French terra cotta tile floors with a distinct classic Provencal appearance. Pave Tile Blog, located in Massachusetts, were the first to develop old world French and Italian terracotta tile flooring collections from old world designs.  It is surprising to know that the natural color of fired terra cottta is not naturally brown.  Brown terra cotta tile is usually a result after a treatment of either wax, oil or stain.

They mention that  many Americans are very predictable, when they order stone flooring.  They often stick to a neutral range of beige, cream and gray colors, while Europeans fully embrace the rich earthy colors.

Why is that?

America is a very young country, and much of our architecture is fairly new.  This can be said for most of the country, with exception the east coast where the earliest settled areas have a primitive British colonial heritage with respect to architecture and decorating.

Compare that to Europe.  Europe is much older and the architecture can be seen as very colorful and vibrant.   I have a passion for Swedish interiors particularly because of the painted finishes.  This pinterest board has over 100 pins of different painted buildings featuring the most beautiful period colors.  Take for example Switzerland, which borders France is rich in color.  In this picture you have roof tops with hues of red, and lovely tones of yellow.  In this picture of Austria, you see brighter tones of red, and light power blue in the architecture.

It can be said that when a culture is surrounded by strong colors, they also feel  comfortable decorating around those same tones.  People who lived in the countryside of France often decorated with the colors they saw in their backyard.  Yellow sunflowers, purple Lilac, and the greenery were tones they felt inspired by.

I believe the reason why the western culture chooses more earth tones is the  architecture is based around the same color ranges.  If you look anywhere in America, the color palette is pretty modern.  Concrete roads are gray and beige and architecture is modern rather than antique which you see in Europe.  As a person ventures into the country, more painted homes appear in various shades.

See additional photos at Gilles Trillard’s Website , Property’s website: Magie des Lieux. If you like this article, please leave a comment, and pin it on facebook and pinterest, and come again!

How To Recreate A 17th Century French Provence Chateau Look In Your Own Home – Part 3

Save

Book Review: French Country Living By Caroline Clifton Mogg

With the pricy cost of books these days, often times, I like to try them out at my library before buying them.  If they are great, I tend to write up a post, because an exceptional book needs to be known.  This is a book worth buying!  I tend to enjoy the books that reveal more of the historical properties, because they provide a unique and fresh approach to decorating.  After looking at thousands of pictures for our many blogs, there are a few books in my library that I can look at over and over again, and they never become dull.  This is one of those books.   With close to 5 stars on Amazon, selling new for $32, and used from $8, this book can be a classic in your library.

There is a great beauty of discovering the old, the worn, something loved for years, and passed down through families.  Caroline Clifton Mogg writes a number of chapters, on the elements which make a home.

Page 12- Color, Page 24 Materials, Page 36 Furniture, Page 48 Fabrics, Page 60 Accessories, Page 72 Kitchen and Eating Areas, Page 86 Living Rooms, Page 100 Bedrooms, Page 112 Bathrooms, Page 122 Hallways & Other Spaces, Page 130 Outdoor Rooms

In this book, 140 pages covers 307 color photographs that illustrate the beauty of the French countryside.  City decorating is quite different from French country decorating for the most part.  The country approch is rustic, rough in some situations, and a bit more relaxed.

One review left this comment:

“If you are afraid of color, this book is for you. Don’t let it convince you, though, that french country is not about bold colors- every other book I’ve seen says the opposite. That said, it is a beatiful book, with lots of rustic elements.”

If you are looking for the saturated colorful interiors like this, this or this, this book covers more of the muted styles.  Intead of rich saturated colors, it works with colors that are muted.  This book certainly presents an elegant approch to the French countryside home, rather than the folk country looks with rich vibrant colors.  Certainly many of these looks that the author presents can be used in the city as well as the country. 

Pictures from the book featured on Blogs

– Trouvais Blog features page 57, 13, 122

-Painted Furniture – Page 46

-Brooke Giannetti- Page 14, 50, 102110, 12, 18, 96, 40, 49, 27

– Aged and Gilded Blog, Page 139, 138, 76

– Paris Apartment- Page 85,

-Zsa Zsa Bellagio Blog- Page 97

Here are a couple more pictures that I cannot locate in the book:

– Spectacular French Doors, here

-A Buttercup Yellow Wall Cabinet – here

Quotes From The Book:

“From gray also come mauve and lilac—either as bright as the color of violets or or closet to the quiet, almost musty tones that are quintessential French, and which look so winning when teamed with gray green, perhaps used on woodwork.  A more sophisticated combination that is sometimes seen is a gray mauve offset by a dark, almost terra-cotta red—the red known as sang de boeuf makes a particularly effective contrast. Pinks and peaches are also to be found among the range of
French country colors, but they are not childlike nursery tones—there is nothing of a sugary or sweet nature about them. Like so many French country colors, the pinks and peaches appear
almost organic, seeming as though they might have emerged from the color of the original plaster than applied on top of it,  and again, they often seem to include a hint of pale ancestry”

“A wide variety of woods is evident in rural interiors,but the woods used in different parts of France
were and are largely those from the trees growing in the surrounding countryside—fruit woods such as walnut and cherry, and traditional hardwoods such as oak and elm. Exotics such as mahogany or
maple will not be found in abundance here, for self-sufficiency is the name of the game”

Reviews:

By “Caroline Clifton-Mogg’s French Country Living is a delicious book to look at; the pages are filled with beautiful, airy rooms and the accompanying text does a good job of explaining how the effect is achieved–lots of grey in the colors, painted furniture, small-sized fabric prints, etc.

By Hollygolightly- “This is French country living in the Marie-Antoinette-at-Petit-Trianon style, not truly rural la France profonde, however. The exquisitely restored rooms are filled with priceless antiques, and a cursory glance over the photo credits suggests that the majority of houses shown are located in either Provence, or the richer departements near Paris (the most famous house in Yvelines is Versailles, if that gives you an idea of what’s in the neighborhood of some of the chateaux photographed). Having seen more than one room in a rural French house with vinyl wallpaper on the ceiling and door, I can only wish that all of French country life was this beautiful! ”

By John Matlock -“In this book, hundreds of color photographs by Christopher Drake, illustrate the essence of the French countryside. The book is in two parts, the first emphasizes the soft, non-contrasting colors and the natural materials and textures that are distinctly France. The second part of the book looks at the overall style. It looks at the French home, starting of course with the kitchen (this is after all France). Only then does it move on to the rest of the house, ending with the French garden. And this is France, so the garden also emphasises a place to eat and drink.”

By Julie BarrettZiegler- Fantastic photography, and a generous, diverse selection of beautiful interiors. From iconic over-the-top French decorating, to simple Provençal country style, this book celebrates the special environments for real living evoked by good French decorating style.

By D Thoden- I got this book as a Christmas present 3 yrs ago, and it is still one of the best decorating books I have ever owned. If you like whites, creams and soft, grayish colors, along with authentic chippy antiques shown in lovely old homes, you should love this book. It’s not LOOK AT ME decorating. It’s used, comfy, old furniture and fabrics, and it’s divine. This book ultimately changed the look of my home. The holidays were especially rough that year; I missed my Mother and was sick while at my in-laws over the holidays. This book got me thru it all!!! I just laid in bed and read it and looked at the photos over and over.

By Gerard Brady -Love this book. I have all kind of pages marked for ideas. Beautiful pictures, descriptions. The book is in great shape as advertised. It will become one of my “go to” books for decorating. Love it!

By Savannah, GA USA- By I love this book for ideas and inspiration. My favorite part of France is the Loire Valley and Sologne. The pictures in this book show that classic casual style. I also love Paris, but the Parisian style is more formal and ornate. I like the brick and terra cotta floors, the wood furniture, the lavender and sunflowers of the countryside. This will take you beyond chicken figurines and calico prints! Great read, great price. Great book for daydreaming! Enjoy!I have also bought Italian Country Living by the same author. Another wonderful book.

By T. Brashear “Dessa”- Sumptuous photos of sumptuous French provincial houses, with helpful guidelines about what characterizes French country decors (though I agree with one reviewer that not too many French country houses look like this). I particularly like the author’s emphasis on how livable the style is, and find this to be true too. Buyer beware however that French country may look a lot different in an American ranch house: a lot of the charm comes from plastered stone walls, old beams and well-worn tile floors.

By Stacey M Smith- Beautiful book. Inspiring photographs that capture French country style (obviously, note the title). My only complaint about Clifton-Mogg books is that the photos are recycled. I see the same photos is many other books. There are MANY wonderful estates, villas, and country properties out there – – – it would be nice to see more of them instead of these multi-used images. The “recycles photos” are no problem if you just have one of her books – – but if you buy many European decorating books, you may see repeat photos.

French Country Living By Caroline Clifton Mogg2

 Striking distressed doors with a neutral background

French Country Living By Caroline Clifton Mogg 12

One common paint technique we don’t see today is the bottom half of a wall painted in a different color.  Perhaps this was done to clone the look of wood architectural wainscoting? 

It certainly looks amazing, and a look that can add a bit of color into a room,without having to paint an entire wall. 

Look how the pale pink on the walls picks up the beauty of the tile.  Spectacular!

Book review French Country Living By Caroline Clifton Mogg

This is the other part of this amazing room

Nicky Haslam’s Romantic Country House

Nicky Haslam’s Folly de Grandeur: Romance and Revival in an English Country House’, is Haslam’s newest book on authentic, English country style decorating.

Haslam shows interiors with carefully mismatched antique and vintage furniture, with color palettes of warm welcoming tones.   From vignettes, to getting the most bang from your hallway, Haslam gives away a wealth of visual interest to the reader.  Learn how to incorporate art, accessories and furniture for a home which is comfortable, yet strikingly beautiful.

Haslam shows off his own 1720 house in Folly de Grandeur.   Floor plans and diagrams illustrate the homes detailed history, as well as the traditional garden, furnishings, and the details of the conservatory.  Images of the house through the seasons shows his true love and attention for the home’s details.  Images of his collecting from flea market finds and treasures from boot sales are captivating.   He shows off upholstery, curtains, chair backs, improvised lampshades and slipcovers.

Interesting Links:

– Nicky Haslam -British Interior Designer’s Website

-Nicky Haslam’s Country House – WSJNicky Haslam, renowned interior designer and London man-about-town, calls a 16th-century royal hunting lodge in the English countryside his home away from home—rose chintz sofas, portraits, flourishing garden and all

-NOW AND THEN: Dreamy English Country Cottages by Colefax and Fowler- Decor Arts Now

-1stdibs Introspective – Nicky Haslam- 1st Dibs

-Interview: Nicky Haslam- House & Home Magazine

-Oh, Nicky, You’re So Fine, You Blow My Mind, Hey Nicky! The Style Saloniste

>Other Design Books Featuring Nicky Haslam:

Designers at Home: Personal Reflections on Stylish Living –Personal Reflections on Stylish Living presents the personal living spaces of fifty distinctive design leaders, including Charlotte Moss, Celerie Kemble, Ashley Hicks, Barry Dixon, India Hicks, Vicente Wolf, Martyn Lawrence Bullard, Kevin Sharkey, Suzanne Rheinstein, Rose Tarlow, Jay Jeffers, Michelle Nussbaumer, Jan Showers, Alex Papachristidis, Madeline Stuart, Matthew Patrick Smyth, Colette van den Thillart, Malcolm James Kutner, Ken Fulk, Scot Meacham Wood, Bunny Williams and more. These select dwellings range from chic apartments and luxurious estates, to charming country homes.

Sheer Opulence (Decor Best-Sellers) by Nicholas Haslam

Reviews:

By L. M. Keefer

You will savor every word and image in this book as Nicky Haslam takes you on a remarkably personal tour of his folly of an English home which he describes as “quite simply the prettiest small house in the world.” Formerly the home of renowned designer John Fowler, Haslam fell in love with its “fairy-tale facade”, as Fowler did shortly after the end of WWII. Haslam describes seeing the folly for the first time: “History does repeat itself. And so it was that, some thirty years later, I turned the last bend in the rough lane through these woods, came to a clearing by a lake, and, turning, saw this rose-pink, brick-gabled folly glinting in the evening sun.”

Haslam recounts, “I like to think of him (Fowler) standing in the doorway as his celebrated clients like Debo Devonshire or the Pembrokes drew up to be greeted by his quizzical smile and promise of a nifty Blood Mary. One of his early assistants, Nina Campbell, told me recently that, even before he came to live here, John’s nickname was ‘Folly’ Fowler….”

Situated on the hunting grounds of King Henry VII, the home has a rather magical past before Fowler. It was on these grounds that Catherine of Aragon first set her black Spanish eyes on King Henry’s son Arthur, Prince of Wales, to whom she was betrothed. You may sense a certain magic pervading the house, or maybe it’s Haslam’s unabashed affection for it. In its Tudor beginnings as a refuge from hunting, it was a humble three rooms. Around 1720-40 a fanciful Jacobean facade was affixed to the front, and it was expanded.

Describing his first walk-through after Fowler inhabited it, Haslam allows us to see it through his eyes: “There was no furniture inside the house the first time I saw it…. But in each of the tiny rooms – not one is more than 12 feet wide – the walls were beautiful…. Shabby drapes, some edged in fading hand-painted borders, fell forlornly at dusty windows. Le Grand Meaulnes and Miss Havisham had nothing on this sleeping timeless Wunderkammer. And, strange as it seems now, I knew then that I must retain an echo of this delabre atmosphere; it seemed an essential element of the building’s magical being.”

You may feel you are in the midst of an E.M. Forster novel as you read this, complete with iridescent photos by Simon Upton, to accompany the descriptions.

Leaving much of the home the way Fowler left it, Haslam brings fresh life and luster to it with his original and fresh style. He says of his style: “It would be hopeless to pretend that my style, at home, is anything but a hodgepodge of the things I love….And the house’s soul doesn’t seem to object to the hodgepodge.” It seems every room and piece in the home has a story, and Haslam is happy to tell them in his colorful and amusing storytelling style. His storytelling matches his decor: charming, lighthearted, insouciant, droll and sentimental.

You may find yourself raptly reading every word and studying the pages as Haslam chats about the house and its history, walls, soft furnishings, curtains and drapery, and furniture. Then he takes you on a grand tour of the rooms: the old hall, the staircase hall, the library, the dining room, the kitchen, the flower room, the guest rooms and master bedroom and John Fowler’s old bedroom, which, surprisingly was one of the smallest bedrooms in the home.

Along the tour, Haslam sprinkles his design admonishments: “Increase the scale of wall coverings in small spaces.” And “I never buy anything purely for its monetary value. I like possessions that smile back at me.” Then there’s: “Edging chintz in a solid color is an essential touch.” (This book may make you wonder if it will be the catalyst for reviving the classical appeal of chintz in a major way.)

You will get to stroll outside, too, and view the terrace, the conservatory, the lake and the unique Garden Room. You may feel you have stayed for a pleasant weekend as Halsam’s guest.

This is already one of my favorite of the many decor and design books I own. It should become a classic in design libraries. If you like florals, stripes, painted walls and furniture, tole and hurricane lamps, ruffles, chinoiserie, slipcovers, skirted tables, leaded glass, carved mantels, flagstone, portraits, architectural engravings, busts, books, flowers and rooms that look like they have evolved for 30 years – because these did – you should adore this book. If you enjoy English, cottage or European country styles, you should have this book in your library, or on your ottoman to peruse over and over again. Because you will.

 

Nicky Haslam- Featured On Kalynor Blog

Nicky Haslam- Featured On Kalynor Blog

Nicky Haslam Architectural Digest January 2011 Little Augury Blog 

 

Nicky Haslam Design Featured On Meade Design Group Blog

Nicky Haslam Design Featured On Meade Design Group Blog

Nicky Haslam Design Featured On Meade Design Group Blog

Nicky Haslam – Mrs Blandings Blog

Nicky Haslam’s Country House- online.wsj.com

Nicky Haslam Pinterest

Nicky Haslam – New Orleans- nh-design.co.uk

 Nicholas Haslam DesignThis Is Glamorous Blog

 

Nicholas Haslam DesignThis Is Glamorous Blog

Nicholas Haslam DesignThis Is Glamorous Blog

Nicholas Haslam Design- littleaugury.blogspot.com 

Save

3 Ways To Borrow Pam Pierce’s Slipcover Looks For Your Provence Home

Pam Pierce has single-handedly brought back the popularity of slipcovers, as her interiors bring forth the charm of the old world European interiors to center stage once again.  Slipcovers have always played a key role in her interior designs.  Linen ruffles and gatherings in dark olive, and oatmeal are paired with stone floors, re-claimed wood tables, white washed wood furniture, and time aged painted decor.  Pierce tends to use natural materials like stucco, limestone, reclaimed beams, and sea-grass to create a sense of warmth and history.  Her designs also incorporate architectural salvage such as reclaimed antique doors, and iron to create an aged European feel.

Decorators and homeowners have realized the possibilities that slipcovers offer a home. Slip-covers are not only decorative, but practical. At one time, slipcovers served the means of protecting upholstered furniture from the dust of summer months, although they have evolved over the years, from just large sheets which covered furniture, to be tailored to fit the shape of sofas and chairs, even having decorative pleating, ruffles and embroidery.

3 Ways To Borrow Pam Pierce’s Slipcover Looks:

1. Use The Same Material On All Of Your Furniture

Get the look of a set for less, by slip-covering all of your furniture in the room with the same material.   Unite several pieces of furniture out of the same bolt of material.  Buying matching sets of vintage or antique furniture can be rare and costly.  Create the look of a set by using the same material on all the pieces.  Create drapery out of the same material to unite the room.  Several ebay sellers offer bolts of fabric, which can be shipped to your home without having to drive from store to store.

2. Choose Natural Fabrics

Heavy linen, and cotton canvas have been popular as natural slipcover choices.  French tickings can give a natural look, while at the same time, isn’t plain to look at.  Consider using unbleached muslin, which can be dyed in soft shades of blue, green, or yellow. Gingham, simple checks and stripes lend a sophisticated touch to a Provence styled home.  Stripes, patterns, florals hide dirt well, and are easier to launder.  Checks, stripes and florals work hand in hand.  Consider using 2 or three fabrics together in a room to create interest.

3. Go The Extra Mile With Detailed Slipcovers

Gathers, and wide flat box-pleats add interest to the bottom of slipcovers. These details can be used just below the seat of the chair,  on a line with the seat frame. This style works particularly well with French chairs, as the legs themselves are decorative in themselves that they do not need to be concealed.  Consider pairing down the accessories and furniture in your room, and opt for longer gathers, which puddle on the floor.  Work this idea in larger rooms, where the furniture itself is the main focal point.

Additional Links:

– Drop Cloth Slip Cover Tutorial-beneathmyheart.net

-How To Make A Club Chair Slipcover- lisaroy.ca

-DIY Ottoman Slip Cover-dittledattle.blogspot.com

-How To Sew Double Cord Welting –littlegreennotebook.blogspot.com

-Upholstery Adhesive – Beacon Magna-Tac 809 –littlegreennotebook.blogspot.com

-How to Make a Sofa Slipcover- makethingsforhome.blogspot.com

-How To Bleach Drop Cloth- myjoyinthejourney.blogspot.com

-Slip Cover Tutorial – 6 Part Video Series- missmustardseed.com

-How To Make A Chair Slipcover- honeybearlane.com

-Wing Back Slipcover- thebrickpathstudio.blogspot.com

 


Save

Linen- Decorating Ideas For Your French Provincial Home

Suzanne Kasler Southern Accents Magazine

Suzanne Kasler -Photo Credit Trouvais

Linen is still the most desired fabric for decorators and interior designers alike. Linen is elegant, durable, and simply luxurious. Linen is the strongest of the vegetable fibers and has 2 to 3 times the strength of cotton.

Linen is from raw flax, a bast fiber taken from the stalk of the plant. Linen is one of the oldest textile fibers known to man.

Over 4000 years ago, it was woven in Egypt and used to wrap royal mummies.Not only is the linen fiber strong, it is smooth, making the finished fabric lint free. It also does wrinkle easily but also presses easily.

Linen, like cotton, can also be boiled without damaging the fiber. From creamy white to light tan, linen can be easily dyed and the color does not fade when washed.

Linen also happens to be highly absorbent and a good conductor of heat, but also has the qualities of keeping cool making it an ideal fabric for summer garments.

-Linen is also prone to mildew in extreme conditions. Don’t make the same mistake that I did and hang drapes in a solarium’s that collects water on the windows, because overtime your drapes will collect mold. Linen on the other hand does well in light conditions compared to all other fabrics due to its inherent resistance to UV damage. – Linen easily creases and wrinkles, and tends to hold the wrinkles, so if you don’t mind that, it could be lovely for slipcovers. Linen has very little stretch, so be prepared to make your slipcovers a little extra large, as linen will shrink a little. Never put linen in a hot dryer. High heat causes the linen fibers to shrink and break. Consider letting your linen slipcovers dry on a table or on Air dry or tumble.

-Linen should be ironed with a good quality steam iron while it is damp, if you choose to iron at all. The more often linen is worn and washed, the softer it will become. However, if you are looking for a crisp appearance, ironing is a must. Use a steam iron and sprinkle on additional water if necessary to get a smooth finish. Press linen on the wrong side to prevent shiny spots. Use spray-on starch to get a crisp appearance. -Of all the areas where you could use linen, the fabric looks best with drapery, because it doesn’t need to be washed as often, which also limits the lengthy pressing sessions.

Consider linen for your drapes. The material looks elegant, rich, yet very natural in appearance, making it a must have for Provence interiors.

 

French Provincial Furniture – French Provence Decorating Ideas -Aurélien and Pascale Deleuze’s French Home

French Provincial Furniture – French Provence Decorating Ideas -Aurélien and Pascale Deleuze’s French Home

Modo Textured 100-Percent Slub Cotton 3-Piece Duvet Sham Set only $54 dollars. Wrinkle Resistant 300-Thread Count Reversible Cotton Duvet Set Stripe– Twin, Full, Queen, and King $45. Safavieh Becca Grey Linen Dining Chair $249

French Provincial Furniture – French Country Caned Linen Chaise

French Country Bastille Caned Linen Oak Chaise Long Chair $1599.

Sussex Beige Linen Club Chair only $454!

This Louis XVI Armchair Only $319!

French Provence Furniture -Maison French Country Natural Linen Rectangle Tufted Ottoman

Maison French Country Natural Linen Rectangle Tufted Ottoman $1150

Ethan French Country Dark Limed Gray Oak Linen Dining Chair $499

French Country Weathered Gray Hemp Linen Dining Chair $499

French Provence Furniture – White Linen French Country Cloris Bench

White Linen French Country Cloris Bench $1850.

Linen Pillow Cover with Jute Embroidery $33. Cotton Linen Pillow Cover with Jute & Mother Of Pearl Embroidery Sea Horses Ballard Essential Panel Natural Linen 108 Inch-$99 Springcrest™ Trim Linen Drum Shade $14.99 Maytex Twill Wing Chair Cover $71.24 Williamsburg William and Mary Matelasse Pillow, Linen $51.67 Oval Hardback Natural Linen Shade $30.00 Tumbleweed Faux Linen Sheer $29.00 Progress Lighting Off White Shade 1-Inch $16.00

thewhitedresser.com-A White Home On A Budget- Result Amazing

More Inspiration!

thewhitedresser.com-Add Softness and Elegancy of White in Your Home

More Inspiration!

thewhitedresser.com-Painted Maison Jansen Furniture

More Inspiration!

Save

70 Picture Inspirations Of French Provence Style Interiors

Old World French Provence Homes- maison-deco

Grand Provence Style-maison-deco.com

French furniture in the 17th and 18th centuries has been considered to be some of the most breathtaking furniture in history. In 1610 when Louis XIII took the throne, the furniture styles around the regions of France started developing their own signature styles. In Provence, furnishings were carved from walnut, while in Normandy, oak was popular for making armoires, buffets, and vaisseliers.

The Provencal style has always been inspired by the beautiful colors of France.  The atmosphere of the countryside picks up the bright colors of lavender, yellow, mint and blue.  Provencal style changes with the colors of the seasons.  The dirt and natural settings seen around France has been the inspiration for earthenware and ceramic hand-painted pottery.

Some of the key elements of this style are stone flooring, rustic furniture,wrought iron accessories,  tin enamel, painted pottery, raw cotton and linen.  Architectural elements such as beams and alcoves,  basin sinks, concrete corbels bring in the antique elements we all desire and admire. Soft, linen curtains and heavy linen upholstery has been a timeless choice for sofas, side chairs, slipcovers and cushions.  The perfection of raw-wood furniture has been thought to be a noble choice for furnishings for centuries.  Working with rustic hardware, such as wrought iron brings to mind the pastoral, country living that many people find refuge in.  It is not only a style, but a way of life that is deeply anchored in a traditional way of life.

moissonnier 2007 CD 022

Moissonnier Furniture

Old World French Provence Homes- maison-deco.com

Old World French Provence Homes- maison-deco.com

Decorating With The Color Green French Provence Style

Color Inspiration

Color Inspiration from here, , here, here, and here

There are so many ways to decorate with green, where do you start?   One starting point is to find a shade that you love.   Borrow color combination ideas from vintage packaging.  French packaging often pairs together colors that just work with one another.

Here are just a few of the colors that are found in France……

Artichoke – the color of fresh uncooked artichoke.

Fern Green is a vivid shade of green that resembles ferns. Fern green was used in 1902.

Laurel green is a medium light hue of greenish gray, first used as a color in 1705.

Myrtle green, represents the color of the leaves of the Myrtle plant, first used as a color in 1835

Teal is a dark cyan color that is seen on the neck of a duck.  – Colors From Wikipedia

How To Decorate With Shades of Green

– Add In Green Foliage – Don’t forget the blossoms, says Nicole Sforza. “Consider green (or greenish) flowers. Forsythia branches, which bloom yellow before sprouting bright green leaves, look great on the console. The Billy buttons, arranged in a light green vase on the table, can last up to two weeks. Also try Lenten roses, which have soft green flowers and foliage.” Real Simple Magazine

– Use Muted Shades of Green– In this link, Martha Stewart shows off 24 of the best rooms decorated around green that were originally featured in her magazines over the years.  In all the pictures, one common trait exists, – she uses old world colors that are muted.

– Pair Natural Wood With Lighter Blues and Green Painted Walls Natural Wood Tones– Stephanie Hoppen says “sandy beiges, and limewash finishes balance barely-there blue rooms. And don’t forget about paint finishes. Chalky flat finishes are warm, while shiny blues will give a bit of a chill”

– Use Muted Softer Colors In Main Rooms, And Brighter Ones In Less Used Rooms– Sasha Emerson, an interior designer says  “When choosing a blue hue, consider how often you’re in the room. For example, don’t choose a very bold blue for a living room — you might tire of the color. Save it for a den or a playroom and pick a more serene tone for central living spaces”

Cooler Tones Can Work With Glass or Mirrors -Stephanie Hoppen says “Frosty blues are elegant with soft creams and shiny accents such as glass. Take the chill off icy colors by teaming them with warm browns, reds, or oranges”

– Pair Jewel Tones Together -Jennifer Flanders says, “The color emerald is synonymous with wealth, prosperity and luxury, so I think it naturally works with other colors that evoke the same air of richness and elegance.  Many other jewel tones mix well with emerald green, but in particular I love this color with deep blues and shimmery golds.”

Farrow-and-Ball Paint

Color Combinations- Real Simple Magazine gives us 4 color combinations.

  • Pair together moss green and soft blue.  Think about colors that play off nature.  The soft colors found in trees, and sky.  You can go bolder with both colors, or really soft subtle shades in the ligher hues.
  • Sea Foam Green and Chocolate.  Think about darker floors, with painted green distressed furniture.  Chocolate walls, with lighter green accessories.  Sea-foam wall colors, with darker rustic WOOD accessories.
  • Consider the classic Rugby- Kelly green and bright white. Go for a bit of a bold contrast with the brilliant Kelly green and white as an accent.
  • Pair together lime green and soft pink.  These two colors can give a soft appearance.  Consider filling an over-sized glass vase with pink cherry blossoms.

Shades of Green

 Home Beautiful’s Color Selections

The Oprah Winfrey Collection

The Oprah Winfrey Collection

Check out my favorite pieces from Oprah’s collection here

Cabinet Bonnier de La MossonCabinet Bonnier de La Mosson

Joseph Bonnier de la Mosson (1702 – 1744), was a French aristocrat who loved science and began collecting exotic insects, snakes, shells and birds. These wooden cases were acquired in 1744 when they were auctioned off following the death of Joseph Bonnier de la Maison, whom was an extremely knowledgeable amateur scientist and connoisseur of art.

They were installed in the King’s Garden Room. Inside these five units made from Dutch wood decorated with serpents a collection of preserved [“dried”] animals. In 1935, the cabinets were disassembled, and were installed permanently in the the Museum of Natural History in the Jardin des Plantes central library in 1979. They are considered an “Historic Monument.”

Borrow this look for yourself, by painting your French furniture a muted shade of light green, and use a shade of white paint to bring out the carved features in your french furniture….

3 Tips To Getting A French Look For Your Home

Picture Credit –themalibubergdorfblonde on ebay

18th Century Home Located in Located in Uzeste, France Maison-Deco

18th Century Home Located in Located in Uzeste, France  Maison-Deco

Here are three tips to get the French looks in your own home.

1.   Painted furniture shouldn’t look freshly painted.  Black furniture, can be left alone, although lighter colored furniture should have some sort of washed glaze over it.  Blue looks fabulous with a white wash.  Green paint looks great with a cigar glaze.  White looks great with distressing and a slight aged look.  It is amazing what a simple step of glaze can do for any painted piece of furniture.

2.  I never clued into sheens until several years after I started painting.  Your walls should always be eggshell, or matte.  Glossy walls don’t work with antique styled interiors, although work terrific in Hollywood Regency, or modern homes.   Matte walls show no flaws, because the light doesn’t reflect off of them, making them appear like fresh drywall.   Furniture on the other hand should never have a flat finish.  Even if you finish your furniture using a flat paint, furniture should be finished with wax, glaze, or polycrylic.  I have learned that an eggshell or a satin works the very best on furniture.  Glossy furniture should be very carefully selected for bombe pieces, or regency furniture that has a slight modern touch to it.  Again, specific styles call for specific finishes.  If you want your pieces to have a flat sheen to them, consider mixing a water based polycrylic with water.  Paint on a light coat, and the overall effect will look matte, but will stay protected.

3.  Architecture can be just as important as furniture.  Consider investing in faux finished walls that look like limestone, or washed plaster walls.  Brick, or stone flooring is a trademark design of the French Provence style.  Invest in anything with stone or metal.  Makeover that fireplace with rough white stone, or consider installing faux brick to 1/3 of the wall.  Find the elements of the French style and collect the main elements of the style, but also focus on the architectural elements.  Focusing on both elements will pull together your look with a designer edge.

Classic French Interiors

Classic French Interiors – classic-french-chateaux.co.uk/

Classic French Interiors

Classic French Interiors – classic-french-chateaux.co.uk/

Great French Provincial Design Is a Philosophy More Than a Look

French Provence Style

French Provence Style-magazine.pierrefrey.com

New York interior designer Miles Redd says, “Life in the 21st Century means taking the best of history and making it work for you.” That is a good philosophy to adopt, whether your design preferences are for contemporary, island chic, British Colonial or French Provincial. Selecting the best of the design traditions and adapting them to your individual lifestyle is the very essence of the design ethic.

What a Feeling

“Most of all, country French is a feeling,” according to French Heritage. Speaking of furniture, the company, which was founded by French-born Jacques Wayser and his American wife, subscribes to the adage that there is no one “period” in history that encompasses French provincial. It is, rather, a way of life, and a philosophy that encompasses the past and adapts to modern needs, uses and sensibilities. In that sense, it is neither rigid, nor formal; it is, however, very personal and always changing to meet new needs and new circumstances.

That accounts for its undying popularity. French country design is seemingly always fresh, always appropriate, and always evolving.

Flexible and Inventive

Remaining true to the beloved French Provincial style ethic is simple when you first adopt the philosophy: Respect for the styles of the past and a willingness to revise, modernize and “make do” when necessary. The essence of court-originated style during the reigns of French monarchs was captured in informal style and inexpensive woods for the “common” folk in the provinces.

Well-made, sturdy furniture lasted for generations. However, years of use took their toll, and inventive families had to make repairs and replace parts, adapting to changing needs. In time, the painted finishes and well-used looks became well-loved as well.

Personal Choice Dictates

Today, the range of options in interior design is sometimes overwhelming. It can be daunting to face the myriad of decisions involved in completing an interior design scheme. The choice of country French as a decor, however, is a wise one, allowing a wide range of available choices with an emphasis on lasting comfort and individuality.

For all your choices, ranging from wall colors to floor coverings, from furniture to window coverings, and from accessories to art, you should realize that there are no hard and fast rules. If you prefer an uncluttered modern look, you can leave windows bare if there is no issue with privacy. On the other hand, wood blinds from TheShadeStore.com, in your choice of finishes, would give you room-darkening possibilities and be perfectly suited to a provincial scheme. You could soften the look with flowing draperies in a colorful toile print, or with gathered panels in a bright country check.

Animal-ish and Whimsy

Charles Faudree and Betty Lou Phillips are two of the most respected interior designers in the country; each has a personal style. They rely on a bit of “whimsy” to make a room come alive, utilizing color, layers of fabric, and a mix of textures and themes. Iconic French symbols appear as well: The fleur-de-lis, an occasional Napleonic bee, chickens, gold braid, and French words. According to their sites (CharlesFaudree.com, and BettyLouPhillips.com), advice given by each designer is the same: “Enjoy the style!”

Guest Post by Timothy Allen

 

Timothy is an interior designer with an eye for straight lines and Mediterranean styling.

Chateau Montgeoffroy

Chateau Montgeoffroy- www.ot-saumur.fr

Chateau Montgeoffroy

Chateau Montgeoffroy- magazine.pierrefrey.com