Book Review: French Country Living By Caroline Clifton Mogg

With the pricy cost of books these days, often times, I like to try them out at my library before buying them.  If they are great, I tend to write up a post, because an exceptional book needs to be known.  This is a book worth buying!  I tend to enjoy the books that reveal more of the historical properties, because they provide a unique and fresh approach to decorating.  After looking at thousands of pictures for our many blogs, there are a few books in my library that I can look at over and over again, and they never become dull.  This is one of those books.   With close to 5 stars on Amazon, selling new for $32, and used from $8, this book can be a classic in your library.

There is a great beauty of discovering the old, the worn, something loved for years, and passed down through families.  Caroline Clifton Mogg writes a number of chapters, on the elements which make a home.

Page 12- Color, Page 24 Materials, Page 36 Furniture, Page 48 Fabrics, Page 60 Accessories, Page 72 Kitchen and Eating Areas, Page 86 Living Rooms, Page 100 Bedrooms, Page 112 Bathrooms, Page 122 Hallways & Other Spaces, Page 130 Outdoor Rooms

In this book, 140 pages covers 307 color photographs that illustrate the beauty of the French countryside.  City decorating is quite different from French country decorating for the most part.  The country approch is rustic, rough in some situations, and a bit more relaxed.

One review left this comment:

“If you are afraid of color, this book is for you. Don’t let it convince you, though, that french country is not about bold colors- every other book I’ve seen says the opposite. That said, it is a beatiful book, with lots of rustic elements.”

If you are looking for the saturated colorful interiors like this, this or this, this book covers more of the muted styles.  Intead of rich saturated colors, it works with colors that are muted.  This book certainly presents an elegant approch to the French countryside home, rather than the folk country looks with rich vibrant colors.  Certainly many of these looks that the author presents can be used in the city as well as the country. 

Pictures from the book featured on Blogs

– Trouvais Blog features page 57, 13, 122

-Painted Furniture – Page 46

-Brooke Giannetti- Page 14, 50, 102110, 12, 18, 96, 40, 49, 27

– Aged and Gilded Blog, Page 139, 138, 76

– Paris Apartment- Page 85,

-Zsa Zsa Bellagio Blog- Page 97

Here are a couple more pictures that I cannot locate in the book:

– Spectacular French Doors, here

-A Buttercup Yellow Wall Cabinet – here

Quotes From The Book:

“From gray also come mauve and lilac—either as bright as the color of violets or or closet to the quiet, almost musty tones that are quintessential French, and which look so winning when teamed with gray green, perhaps used on woodwork.  A more sophisticated combination that is sometimes seen is a gray mauve offset by a dark, almost terra-cotta red—the red known as sang de boeuf makes a particularly effective contrast. Pinks and peaches are also to be found among the range of
French country colors, but they are not childlike nursery tones—there is nothing of a sugary or sweet nature about them. Like so many French country colors, the pinks and peaches appear
almost organic, seeming as though they might have emerged from the color of the original plaster than applied on top of it,  and again, they often seem to include a hint of pale ancestry”

“A wide variety of woods is evident in rural interiors,but the woods used in different parts of France
were and are largely those from the trees growing in the surrounding countryside—fruit woods such as walnut and cherry, and traditional hardwoods such as oak and elm. Exotics such as mahogany or
maple will not be found in abundance here, for self-sufficiency is the name of the game”

Reviews:

By “Caroline Clifton-Mogg’s French Country Living is a delicious book to look at; the pages are filled with beautiful, airy rooms and the accompanying text does a good job of explaining how the effect is achieved–lots of grey in the colors, painted furniture, small-sized fabric prints, etc.

By Hollygolightly- “This is French country living in the Marie-Antoinette-at-Petit-Trianon style, not truly rural la France profonde, however. The exquisitely restored rooms are filled with priceless antiques, and a cursory glance over the photo credits suggests that the majority of houses shown are located in either Provence, or the richer departements near Paris (the most famous house in Yvelines is Versailles, if that gives you an idea of what’s in the neighborhood of some of the chateaux photographed). Having seen more than one room in a rural French house with vinyl wallpaper on the ceiling and door, I can only wish that all of French country life was this beautiful! ”

By John Matlock -“In this book, hundreds of color photographs by Christopher Drake, illustrate the essence of the French countryside. The book is in two parts, the first emphasizes the soft, non-contrasting colors and the natural materials and textures that are distinctly France. The second part of the book looks at the overall style. It looks at the French home, starting of course with the kitchen (this is after all France). Only then does it move on to the rest of the house, ending with the French garden. And this is France, so the garden also emphasises a place to eat and drink.”

By Julie BarrettZiegler- Fantastic photography, and a generous, diverse selection of beautiful interiors. From iconic over-the-top French decorating, to simple Provençal country style, this book celebrates the special environments for real living evoked by good French decorating style.

By D Thoden- I got this book as a Christmas present 3 yrs ago, and it is still one of the best decorating books I have ever owned. If you like whites, creams and soft, grayish colors, along with authentic chippy antiques shown in lovely old homes, you should love this book. It’s not LOOK AT ME decorating. It’s used, comfy, old furniture and fabrics, and it’s divine. This book ultimately changed the look of my home. The holidays were especially rough that year; I missed my Mother and was sick while at my in-laws over the holidays. This book got me thru it all!!! I just laid in bed and read it and looked at the photos over and over.

By Gerard Brady -Love this book. I have all kind of pages marked for ideas. Beautiful pictures, descriptions. The book is in great shape as advertised. It will become one of my “go to” books for decorating. Love it!

By Savannah, GA USA- By I love this book for ideas and inspiration. My favorite part of France is the Loire Valley and Sologne. The pictures in this book show that classic casual style. I also love Paris, but the Parisian style is more formal and ornate. I like the brick and terra cotta floors, the wood furniture, the lavender and sunflowers of the countryside. This will take you beyond chicken figurines and calico prints! Great read, great price. Great book for daydreaming! Enjoy!I have also bought Italian Country Living by the same author. Another wonderful book.

By T. Brashear “Dessa”- Sumptuous photos of sumptuous French provincial houses, with helpful guidelines about what characterizes French country decors (though I agree with one reviewer that not too many French country houses look like this). I particularly like the author’s emphasis on how livable the style is, and find this to be true too. Buyer beware however that French country may look a lot different in an American ranch house: a lot of the charm comes from plastered stone walls, old beams and well-worn tile floors.

By Stacey M Smith- Beautiful book. Inspiring photographs that capture French country style (obviously, note the title). My only complaint about Clifton-Mogg books is that the photos are recycled. I see the same photos is many other books. There are MANY wonderful estates, villas, and country properties out there – – – it would be nice to see more of them instead of these multi-used images. The “recycles photos” are no problem if you just have one of her books – – but if you buy many European decorating books, you may see repeat photos.

French Country Living By Caroline Clifton Mogg2

 Striking distressed doors with a neutral background

French Country Living By Caroline Clifton Mogg 12

One common paint technique we don’t see today is the bottom half of a wall painted in a different color.  Perhaps this was done to clone the look of wood architectural wainscoting? 

It certainly looks amazing, and a look that can add a bit of color into a room,without having to paint an entire wall. 

Look how the pale pink on the walls picks up the beauty of the tile.  Spectacular!

Book review French Country Living By Caroline Clifton Mogg

This is the other part of this amazing room

Dan Carithers French Provincial Designs

Dan Carithers October 1999- Featured on Magpies and Magnolias Blog

Now retired after a 50-year career creating rooms photographed for shelter mags like Veranda, House Beautiful, Traditional Home and Southern Accents, Carithers rooms still remain current, and is often the most blogged about designer around.  In 2003, Carithers was named one of House Beautiful’s “Giants of Design”—the highest honor bestowed by the magazine; it’s only been given to a handful of honorees during its 100-year history.

Dan Carithers grew up in small town Jefferson, Georgia, and first gained notoriety as the design director for home furnishings at Rich’s Department Store.   The job had an added bonus of being able to travel abroad which exposed Carithers to the latest home fashions and antiques from London and Paris. Carithers launched his own firm, and also established a long-time consulting position with Baker Furniture, and created an high-end upholstery line with Sherrill Furniture.

Carithers tends to lean towards the elegant side of decorating.  Antique-filled homes with bold punches of color is a signature style of Dan Carithers. He suggests to pick out your accent color first, and repeat it throughout the house.  As you can see in many of his designs, he tends to use neutrals on the walls, such as chocolate browns, creams and beige.  Carithers often used mirrors to expand light, using slipcovers that often left the bones of the chair exposed.  He often utilizes thought-out pieces for his rooms often looking around for the perfect choice.  He mentions that a chair can have great impact in the direction of a room.

 

Dan Carithers French Style Decorating – Carither’s Home Featured in Southern Accents 

Dan Carithers French Style Decorating – Carither’s Home Featured in Southern Accents

Dan Carithers French Style Decorating  Featured in Southern Accents

Dan Carithers French Style Decorating – Carither’s Home Featured in Southern Accents

Dan Carithers- Southern Accents Magazine

Dan Carithers Traditional Home Magazine

Dan Carithers French Style Decorating – Carither’s Home Featured in Southern Accents

Southern Accents Oct 1997

Kitchens I Have Loved Blog scanned in some pictures of the Carithers Home which show a provence styled interior

Carithers Home –Kitchens I Have Loved Blog

Carithers Home –Kitchens I Have Loved Blog

 Dan Carithers In Veranda Magazine

Traditional HomeDan Carithers- Featured On Developing Design Blog

 Dan Carithers October 1999- Featured on Magpies and Magnolias Blog

Dan Carithers October 1999- Featured on Magpies and Magnolias Blog

Dan Carithers October 1999- Featured on Magpies and Magnolias Blog

Dan Carithers October 1999- Featured on Magpies and Magnolias Blog

Dan Carithers October 1999- Featured on Magpies and Magnolias Blog

 

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Tremolet’s Chateau d’Ailly in Normandy

Gerard Tremolet worked in the fashion world most of his life, but after leaving the industry of fashion, he pursued his own interests in interior design. Back in 2007 he and his partner purchased the Chateau d’Ailly in Normandy and renovated it to transform it into a bed and breakfast. To decorate the castle Gerard Tremolet drew his inspiration from his love of the 18th century, adding his own personal touches along the way.  While the colors aren’t historically accurate, Tremolet shows us that bright, bold color can be used in period styled homes and furniture.

Saturated dark red walls in the dining area are paired with a beautiful collection of natural vintage styled baskets and blue-gray provence chairs for a nice contrast.  The combination of the damask wall fabrics, striped velvet fabrics, and iranian patterns show us that even complex color combinations can work together. Colors such as yellow, turquoise, hot pink and lime are some of the colors used throughout the Chateau d’Ailly.  French XV, XVI furniture, and Italian Venetian furniture and accessories are paired together giving off a look that is carefully collected and adored.  A modern styled “Renaissance-style ” approach is used through the home, and can be seen in the guest bedroom.  One the best rooms is shown below.  The walls and curtains are of a Thevenon toile de Jouy.  A Louis XV armchair sits in the bedroom and can one of the best examples of French style in the home.

To read the full article head over to Elle Decor.

Nicky Haslam’s Romantic Country House

Nicky Haslam’s Folly de Grandeur: Romance and Revival in an English Country House’, is Haslam’s newest book on authentic, English country style decorating.

Haslam shows interiors with carefully mismatched antique and vintage furniture, with color palettes of warm welcoming tones.   From vignettes, to getting the most bang from your hallway, Haslam gives away a wealth of visual interest to the reader.  Learn how to incorporate art, accessories and furniture for a home which is comfortable, yet strikingly beautiful.

Haslam shows off his own 1720 house in Folly de Grandeur.   Floor plans and diagrams illustrate the homes detailed history, as well as the traditional garden, furnishings, and the details of the conservatory.  Images of the house through the seasons shows his true love and attention for the home’s details.  Images of his collecting from flea market finds and treasures from boot sales are captivating.   He shows off upholstery, curtains, chair backs, improvised lampshades and slipcovers.

Interesting Links:

– Nicky Haslam -British Interior Designer’s Website

-Nicky Haslam’s Country House – WSJNicky Haslam, renowned interior designer and London man-about-town, calls a 16th-century royal hunting lodge in the English countryside his home away from home—rose chintz sofas, portraits, flourishing garden and all

-NOW AND THEN: Dreamy English Country Cottages by Colefax and Fowler- Decor Arts Now

-1stdibs Introspective – Nicky Haslam- 1st Dibs

-Interview: Nicky Haslam- House & Home Magazine

-Oh, Nicky, You’re So Fine, You Blow My Mind, Hey Nicky! The Style Saloniste

>Other Design Books Featuring Nicky Haslam:

Designers at Home: Personal Reflections on Stylish Living –Personal Reflections on Stylish Living presents the personal living spaces of fifty distinctive design leaders, including Charlotte Moss, Celerie Kemble, Ashley Hicks, Barry Dixon, India Hicks, Vicente Wolf, Martyn Lawrence Bullard, Kevin Sharkey, Suzanne Rheinstein, Rose Tarlow, Jay Jeffers, Michelle Nussbaumer, Jan Showers, Alex Papachristidis, Madeline Stuart, Matthew Patrick Smyth, Colette van den Thillart, Malcolm James Kutner, Ken Fulk, Scot Meacham Wood, Bunny Williams and more. These select dwellings range from chic apartments and luxurious estates, to charming country homes.

Sheer Opulence (Decor Best-Sellers) by Nicholas Haslam

Reviews:

By L. M. Keefer

You will savor every word and image in this book as Nicky Haslam takes you on a remarkably personal tour of his folly of an English home which he describes as “quite simply the prettiest small house in the world.” Formerly the home of renowned designer John Fowler, Haslam fell in love with its “fairy-tale facade”, as Fowler did shortly after the end of WWII. Haslam describes seeing the folly for the first time: “History does repeat itself. And so it was that, some thirty years later, I turned the last bend in the rough lane through these woods, came to a clearing by a lake, and, turning, saw this rose-pink, brick-gabled folly glinting in the evening sun.”

Haslam recounts, “I like to think of him (Fowler) standing in the doorway as his celebrated clients like Debo Devonshire or the Pembrokes drew up to be greeted by his quizzical smile and promise of a nifty Blood Mary. One of his early assistants, Nina Campbell, told me recently that, even before he came to live here, John’s nickname was ‘Folly’ Fowler….”

Situated on the hunting grounds of King Henry VII, the home has a rather magical past before Fowler. It was on these grounds that Catherine of Aragon first set her black Spanish eyes on King Henry’s son Arthur, Prince of Wales, to whom she was betrothed. You may sense a certain magic pervading the house, or maybe it’s Haslam’s unabashed affection for it. In its Tudor beginnings as a refuge from hunting, it was a humble three rooms. Around 1720-40 a fanciful Jacobean facade was affixed to the front, and it was expanded.

Describing his first walk-through after Fowler inhabited it, Haslam allows us to see it through his eyes: “There was no furniture inside the house the first time I saw it…. But in each of the tiny rooms – not one is more than 12 feet wide – the walls were beautiful…. Shabby drapes, some edged in fading hand-painted borders, fell forlornly at dusty windows. Le Grand Meaulnes and Miss Havisham had nothing on this sleeping timeless Wunderkammer. And, strange as it seems now, I knew then that I must retain an echo of this delabre atmosphere; it seemed an essential element of the building’s magical being.”

You may feel you are in the midst of an E.M. Forster novel as you read this, complete with iridescent photos by Simon Upton, to accompany the descriptions.

Leaving much of the home the way Fowler left it, Haslam brings fresh life and luster to it with his original and fresh style. He says of his style: “It would be hopeless to pretend that my style, at home, is anything but a hodgepodge of the things I love….And the house’s soul doesn’t seem to object to the hodgepodge.” It seems every room and piece in the home has a story, and Haslam is happy to tell them in his colorful and amusing storytelling style. His storytelling matches his decor: charming, lighthearted, insouciant, droll and sentimental.

You may find yourself raptly reading every word and studying the pages as Haslam chats about the house and its history, walls, soft furnishings, curtains and drapery, and furniture. Then he takes you on a grand tour of the rooms: the old hall, the staircase hall, the library, the dining room, the kitchen, the flower room, the guest rooms and master bedroom and John Fowler’s old bedroom, which, surprisingly was one of the smallest bedrooms in the home.

Along the tour, Haslam sprinkles his design admonishments: “Increase the scale of wall coverings in small spaces.” And “I never buy anything purely for its monetary value. I like possessions that smile back at me.” Then there’s: “Edging chintz in a solid color is an essential touch.” (This book may make you wonder if it will be the catalyst for reviving the classical appeal of chintz in a major way.)

You will get to stroll outside, too, and view the terrace, the conservatory, the lake and the unique Garden Room. You may feel you have stayed for a pleasant weekend as Halsam’s guest.

This is already one of my favorite of the many decor and design books I own. It should become a classic in design libraries. If you like florals, stripes, painted walls and furniture, tole and hurricane lamps, ruffles, chinoiserie, slipcovers, skirted tables, leaded glass, carved mantels, flagstone, portraits, architectural engravings, busts, books, flowers and rooms that look like they have evolved for 30 years – because these did – you should adore this book. If you enjoy English, cottage or European country styles, you should have this book in your library, or on your ottoman to peruse over and over again. Because you will.

 

Nicky Haslam- Featured On Kalynor Blog

Nicky Haslam- Featured On Kalynor Blog

Nicky Haslam Architectural Digest January 2011 Little Augury Blog 

 

Nicky Haslam Design Featured On Meade Design Group Blog

Nicky Haslam Design Featured On Meade Design Group Blog

Nicky Haslam Design Featured On Meade Design Group Blog

Nicky Haslam – Mrs Blandings Blog

Nicky Haslam’s Country House- online.wsj.com

Nicky Haslam Pinterest

Nicky Haslam – New Orleans- nh-design.co.uk

 Nicholas Haslam DesignThis Is Glamorous Blog

 

Nicholas Haslam DesignThis Is Glamorous Blog

Nicholas Haslam DesignThis Is Glamorous Blog

Nicholas Haslam Design- littleaugury.blogspot.com 

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3 Ways To Borrow Pam Pierce’s Slipcover Looks For Your Provence Home

Pam Pierce has single-handedly brought back the popularity of slipcovers, as her interiors bring forth the charm of the old world European interiors to center stage once again.  Slipcovers have always played a key role in her interior designs.  Linen ruffles and gatherings in dark olive, and oatmeal are paired with stone floors, re-claimed wood tables, white washed wood furniture, and time aged painted decor.  Pierce tends to use natural materials like stucco, limestone, reclaimed beams, and sea-grass to create a sense of warmth and history.  Her designs also incorporate architectural salvage such as reclaimed antique doors, and iron to create an aged European feel.

Decorators and homeowners have realized the possibilities that slipcovers offer a home. Slip-covers are not only decorative, but practical. At one time, slipcovers served the means of protecting upholstered furniture from the dust of summer months, although they have evolved over the years, from just large sheets which covered furniture, to be tailored to fit the shape of sofas and chairs, even having decorative pleating, ruffles and embroidery.

3 Ways To Borrow Pam Pierce’s Slipcover Looks:

1. Use The Same Material On All Of Your Furniture

Get the look of a set for less, by slip-covering all of your furniture in the room with the same material.   Unite several pieces of furniture out of the same bolt of material.  Buying matching sets of vintage or antique furniture can be rare and costly.  Create the look of a set by using the same material on all the pieces.  Create drapery out of the same material to unite the room.  Several ebay sellers offer bolts of fabric, which can be shipped to your home without having to drive from store to store.

2. Choose Natural Fabrics

Heavy linen, and cotton canvas have been popular as natural slipcover choices.  French tickings can give a natural look, while at the same time, isn’t plain to look at.  Consider using unbleached muslin, which can be dyed in soft shades of blue, green, or yellow. Gingham, simple checks and stripes lend a sophisticated touch to a Provence styled home.  Stripes, patterns, florals hide dirt well, and are easier to launder.  Checks, stripes and florals work hand in hand.  Consider using 2 or three fabrics together in a room to create interest.

3. Go The Extra Mile With Detailed Slipcovers

Gathers, and wide flat box-pleats add interest to the bottom of slipcovers. These details can be used just below the seat of the chair,  on a line with the seat frame. This style works particularly well with French chairs, as the legs themselves are decorative in themselves that they do not need to be concealed.  Consider pairing down the accessories and furniture in your room, and opt for longer gathers, which puddle on the floor.  Work this idea in larger rooms, where the furniture itself is the main focal point.

Additional Links:

– Drop Cloth Slip Cover Tutorial-beneathmyheart.net

-How To Make A Club Chair Slipcover- lisaroy.ca

-DIY Ottoman Slip Cover-dittledattle.blogspot.com

-How To Sew Double Cord Welting –littlegreennotebook.blogspot.com

-Upholstery Adhesive – Beacon Magna-Tac 809 –littlegreennotebook.blogspot.com

-How to Make a Sofa Slipcover- makethingsforhome.blogspot.com

-How To Bleach Drop Cloth- myjoyinthejourney.blogspot.com

-Slip Cover Tutorial – 6 Part Video Series- missmustardseed.com

-How To Make A Chair Slipcover- honeybearlane.com

-Wing Back Slipcover- thebrickpathstudio.blogspot.com

 


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Improve Your French Dresser Or Sideboard With Faux Marble

Faux Marble Painted Chest From Old Town Crossing

Marble painting has been an art form since the sixteenth century, and was quite popular in India. In Rajasthan there are around 4000 marble mines and because marble was so widely available, it became a canvas for the local painters. The intricate designs were captured on stone with paint, and sealed to preserve it’s extravagant beauty.

Marble has always been considered a luxury, and can be more expensive in the areas of the world where it isn’t naturally located. The look of marble is the result of interlocking mosaic of carbonate crystals. The swirls and veins form patterns as a result of the mineral impurities such as clay, silt, sand, iron oxides that are present in the layers of the stone. Pakistan is one of the largest marble exporters of the world with exports totaling to around a 100,000 tonnes.

The textured look of marble can add a regal and sophisticated touch to any interior space or piece of furniture, however the trouble is, marble can also grab a chunk of change out of your wallet. Faux marbling is the practice of copying the look of marble with paint.  You can improve the tops of your chests, dressers, sideboards and buffets with faux marble.

Faux stone painting was known to be an art used in Pompeii, but it really took off during the Renaissance in Europe where two schools taught the art of faux painting.  For professional artists during this time, it took an apprentice 10 years or more to fully master the art.  Many of these  techniques were used widely by the 17th century and remained useful in architecture well into the 20th century.

Preparations

Start by identifying the style of marble you want to replicate.  Marble comes in varied hues of white, pink, gray and black.  Go on to the internet and look through the various pictures and decide what look of marble you want to transfer.

Step 1- Sand down the top of your chest or dresser, then paint it with a satin paint.  Satin paint will allow all your other paint layers to be able to move around easier.  Flat paints will only eat up your paint, and cause them to smear.  Start with eggshell.

There are a number of ways to paint marble.  Here are a few ways to start as a beginner:

-One very easy way of getting detail and depth without over thinking things is to use plastic.  Take a garbage bag, and cut it a little larger than the size of your dresser or chest top.  Second paint the plastic, and crumple it slightly before you press the plastic on to the surface.  With your hands or a kitchen dough roller, press the plastic into the paint.  Next, pull the plastic off, and let the paint dry.  When the paint is about dry, smooth out the pattern using an over-sized badger softening brush.This technique works quite well if your paint isn’t thick, but rather thinner.  Ideally, you want to build up several layers of detail. I have found using wood stains, which are tinted and transparent, you can get the depth that is seen in marble.

-Another easy technique is creating marble patterns with a sponge.  Take the sponge and dab it lightly along the surface to produce a “marble-like” pattern.  Take paint and glaze and combine a mixture of 60% transparent glaze to 40% paint.  This will enable your pattern to look a bit more organic in nature.

-In the past I have created marble “veins” using a feather, or a paint brush which you can alter, by notching out some of the hair to create a a three prong comb.  The smaller paint brushes are usually the best.  Drag all your lines diagonally using a twisting and turning motion. Soften the marble lines as the paint is near dry.

The key to faux marble is lots of softening, and transparent layers.  You don’t want your marble to appear like it is a two step process, but rather marble that is deep, and takes on the appearance of rich marble.  A couple prominent veins really go a long way, amongst softer features.

When you are ready to “seal” in the marble look, use poly-crylic clear gloss or satin.  Apply it with a sponge applicator, and let it dry overnight.  Then, using 320-grit sandpaper, lightly buff the surface before sweeping off the dust and apply a final coat with a spray can.  You can buy polycrylic both in a can and in a spray.  The final coat creates a stroke free finish when sprayed.  You may want to repeat this process once after the second coat dries.

Using paint to portray a marble finish isn’t as difficult as you might think.  Don’t over think the finish, and you will love how it turns out.

 

Faux Marble by Pierre Lefumat- $28 Amazon

This is a monument to 60 years dedicated to decorative painting. The first part of the book is a step-by-step guide for painting the most widely imitated marble varieties including white breccia, yellow sienna, sea green, and more. The second part of the book is a gallery of Lefumat’s photorealistic faux marble. Each page represents a closer and closer detailed view. Experts and beginners alike will draw inspiration from this magnificent book

Step by step instruction for recreating Lefumat’s masterworks in Faux Marble. Over 140 pages of rich close-up color photographs of Lefumat’s painted panels. Hundreds of pages of faux marble for reference and inspiration.

French Painted Enfilade With Faux Marble Top- Foxglove Antiques

Faux Marble Painted Chest From Old Town Crossing

 

French Painted Enfilade With Faux Marble Top- Foxglove Antiques

Provincial Style Marble Top Painted Side Table

Provincial Style Marble Top Painted Side Table Doyle Auction

Faux Marble Writing Desk- Hideaway Antiques

Swedish Giltwood And Cream Painted Table With Faux Marble Top- Christies 

Pair White Granite Urns on Faux Marble Pedestals- Gottlieb Gallery

Italian Neoclassic Faux Marble Scagliola Pedestal- David Neligan Antiques

A Painted Faux Marble Serpentine Bombe Commode From Christies

Italian Painted Console Table- Piet Jonker Architectural Antiques

A Pair Of Painted Wooden Night Stands- Piet Jonker Architectural Antiques

A Pair Of Painted Wooden Night Stands- Piet Jonker Architectural Antiques

Set of Four 18th Century Faux Marble Columns 1st Dibs Paris

Louis XV Painted Console Table With A Faux Marble Top- Wirthmore Antiques

Pair of Faux Marble Painted Columns- LEBRETON INTERIEURS

Modern Louis XVI Style Giltwood Table Painted Faux Marble Top- Seller Glo

A Florentine Gilded Console With Faux Marble Top- Valobra Jewelry & Antiques

Pair Faux Marble Columns- Greenwich Living Antiques & Design Center

Located 30 miles south of Paris and widely considered one of the most spectacular examples of 18th-century style, the Château du Marais is home to the apartment of designer Juan Pablo Molyneux and his wife, Pilar. The castle was built by the architect Jean-Benoît-Vincent Barré for Master Jean de La Martinière, Treasurer General of Artillery and Engineering, and has been considered one of the most remarkable examples of castle style Louis XVI located near Paris. This castle has been owned by families like Noailles, Castellane, Talleyrand-Perigord and Pourtales.

Additional Links:

New York Social Diary– The Hotel Claude Passart, the 17th century Paris residence of Mr. and Mrs. Juan Pablo Molyneux.

Designer Juan Pablo Molyneux refurbished the 17th-century structure at Château du Marais with rich tones to suit his grand style. An 18th-century gilt-wood chandelier hangs above a Régence bureau plat, a Louis XVI armchair, and a rug from the 19th century; the oil painting is from the 18th century. (Photo Credits- Architectural Digest September 2006)

Check out the beautiful marble walls

A Pair Of Painted Wooden Night Stands- Piet Jonker Architectural Antiques

19th Century Italian Carved Wood Bust On Faux Marble Base. Thomas Jolly Antiques

20th c. French Faux- Marble Column or Pedestal- Olivier Fleury Inc.

Pair of Italian Faux Marble Planters- Dragonette Ltd

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Frederic Mechiehe’s Provence Home In Hyeres

When Frederic Mechiehe arrived at this chateau in Normandy, he was faced with decaying floors and a missing roof. Everything in this home had to be reassembled or “faked”. Period style wooden stairs were installed and artificially worn and hollowed by an industrial sanding machine. The stone floor with black marble lozenges were also added. In this picture, the only thing genuinely to be period is the Louis XVI barometer on the wall. Taken From-Rooms To Remember – Interiors Inspired by the Past By Barbara Stoeltie.

Interior designer, Frederic Mechiche is known quite well in France for re-creating the old world interiors that many of us dream about.  So it comes at no surprise that his own home would be fulled with beautiful French antiques, and breathtaking detail.  His home is located in Hyeres, which is the Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur region in southeastern France.  Hyères is the oldest resort on the French Riviera.  His home, a fourteenth-century fisherman’s cottage which has retained much of it’s architectural elements  The details which are preserved give the home warmth and depth, and a sense of story behind the charming details.  The irregular walls, original plasterwork and ancient floors have all remained true to their original form and provide some interest.

Avant-Gardenist on Flicker features the chapter that covers Frederic Mechiche in the book Rooms To Remember – Interiors Inspired by the Past By Barbara Stoeltie. Here are few excerpts from the book:

“Whatever the reason, the desire for the patina of a bygone era is very powerful. Frederic Mechichc, one of France’s most prominent designers, has busied himself in his old fisherman’s house in the south of France in an attempt to “deceive the eye”, furiously attacking his walls with a hammer and having them re-stuccoed as many times as necessary to achieve an age-worn surface.Mechiche has proved over the years that he is a master of the most complicated means of achieving an illusion of age. He has stained his walls with pigment, milk, and coffee, ground away at the edges of a stone staircase to create the impression ot wear, and applied layers of paint to a wall, only to scrape them off later to obtain a multi-layered that could have been caused by centuries of repainting.”

” A few years ago, however,he managed to overcome his horror of the French Riviera for long enough to visit a friend in the area who claimed to have found a haven of peace. Strolling through the narrow, twisting streets of an ancient town with a Romanesque church, he was suddenly confronted with “a small, tall house, eaten away by time, unusually beautiful, and up for sale.” The estate agents description of “warped” floors and “appalling” condition were enough to whet his appetite. Mechiehe was on the lookout tor things authentic and deeply suspicious ot terms like “luxury,” “frilly restored,”and “impeccable,” saying “I’d rather contemplate a door and a few windows with their paint peeling off!” Where the patina of centuries did not exist, Frederic Mechiche invented it. First of all, he astonished the whole neighborhood by climbing up a ladder and plastering……  the entire surface of his facade with an ocher paste,daubing it with evil-smelling mud, and drenching the result with hundreds of gallons of greasy, opaque water to recreate the effect of age. Then a team of masons,
carpenters, and painters came and went for six months, and Mechiehe spent weeks going around the demolition yards of the region, tracking down eighteenth-century architectural salvage”

If you like the pictures featured in Rooms To Remember – Interiors Inspired by the Past consider buying the book….

More About Rooms To Remember:

The Stoelties, regular contributors to World of Interiors magazine, depict European and American interiors that use the period of their historic buildings to inspire their interiors. Rather than authentic re-creations of period decorating, these interiors have been designed to combine contemporary decorating styles with historic furniture and decorative accessories”

Barbara Stoeltie has been a regular contributor to The World of Interiors since 1984 and regularly collaborates with her husband Rene’ on magazine articles.Rene’ Stoeltie’s own interiors have been featured in Decoration Internationale, and his photographic work has appeared in magazines all over the world, including The World of Interiors, House and Garden, Elle, Country Homes and Interiors, Harper’s Bazaar, Colonial Homes, and Classic Homes.

Timeless Interiors: Rooms Inspired by the Past by Barbara Stoeltie and Rene Stoeltie– Timeless Interiors is about capturing the romance of the past without throwing away your washing machine and living in an old fashioned way. Primarily an inspirational source book, it shows how to recreate the tricks designers use: she shows why a room looks romantic and how to get that effect through colors, paint, wallpaper, flower arrangements or still-lives on a shelf. The opening chapter of the book is a detailed story of the featured houses. The following sections are divided room by room: halls, sitting rooms, studies, bathrooms, bedrooms, kitchens and dining rooms.

Picture Credits

Picture Credits are due to Sotto Il Monte Vineyards Blog, whom scanned in all these beautiful pictures below.  The original source is – Mediterranean Living By Lisa Lovatt-Smith

Other Beautiful Posts By Sotte Il Monte Vineyards Blog

Christian Tortu – Design Inspiration – Christian Tortu is one of the leading floral designers in France

– Charleston Interior Designer Amelia Handegan’s summer house at Folly Beach

Additional Links:

French Style Authority Blog– French Decorator Frédéric Méchiche

Elle Decor -In a former office building, French decorator Frédéric Méchiche re-creates 18th-century grandeur for a couple who also love contemporary art.

Trouvais Blog– An 18th century Venetian églomisé mirror are from Frédéric Méchiche’s Paris apartment in the January 1994 issue of World of Interiors photographed by René Stoeltie.

Door Sixteen Blog–  Interior designer Frédéric Méchiche‘s 1712 home in le Marais, which he calls “a tribute to Bauhaus in Paris”.

My Best Interior Design Ideas– Interior Designer Frederic Mechiche’s apartment in Paris

Interior Archive– Interior designer Frederic Mechiche’s Parisien home was once 3 separate apartments that he has reorganized to form one light, harmonious apartment on two floors with the guiding idea of creating something of the feel of a small Directoire townhouse. Remodelled with salvaged wooden panelling, period stone floors, cornicing and mouldings the space has the laid back organic feel

Frederic Mechiche in the book Rooms To Remember – Interiors Inspired by the Past By Barbara Stoeltie.

5 Tips To Combine Both Antique And Modern Styles In Your Home

Sébastien and Raphael Llado Levavasseur

There are some people, who just can’t stop gushing about their Provence inspired elegant bedrooms. You may also come across people, who hold minimalist contemporary furniture, in very high esteem. Yet, every once in a while, comes a creative soul, who wishes to incorporate furniture designs from widely varying historical ages, in his home.

The ensuing unique mix of tradition and modernity that their homes possess becomes an extension of their quirky and eclectic personalities. If you happen to be someone, who falls in this category, then the following 5 tips are sure to give you some great ideas.

1. Existing Furniture Must Be Removed

It doesn’t matter if you plan to combine tradition and modernity, in one particular room of your house. Your eclectic vision might even encompass your entire home. Whatever might be the case, a clean space is necessary in order to invite timeless design ideas to inspire your mind.

This means that rather than moving things around, and making haphazard additions and omissions to your design area, you should remove all furniture from it, and start from scratch.

2. Retain Pieces That Match Your Larger Schemes

Once you have removed all furniture from the particular room that you wish to design (or redesign, for that matter), you can proceed to think about what goes and what stays, in them. Here, you need to be objective about the furniture pieces that would mesh into your design, rather than letting your emotions rule.

Remember, only the truly deserving furniture pieces must find a place of honor in your eclectic home.

3. Rethink about Your Walls and Flooring

Sometimes, it is easy to get caught up in the larger designing scheme of your house, so that you completely ignore the finer and subtler details. If you are not careful, you can end up with all the right furniture in your eclectic home, only to realize that the color of your walls, and the material of your floor, totally kills all your efforts.

In order to avoid this, it is advisable that you dabble with neutral colors and designs that go well with all kinds of furniture, be they from the 19th century, or the current era.   This will give your home the poise and balance to carry off an assorted look.

4. Add New Pieces

Once you have got the basics right, then you can proceed to adding more and more appropriate furniture pieces to your room. The key here is to maintain a delicate balance between furniture from differ rent historical periods. You can approach several furniture West Palm Beach stores that have in-house design consultants, who can help you to acquire the right look.

5. Accessorize Leniently

In order to have a really eclectic house, which also feels like home, it is essential to add some personal details to it. You home will look more and more inviting, as you inject drapery, mirrors, framed photographs and art that mix well with the larger plan of your home.  For instance: a postmodernist painting can strangely work well with old-fashioned motifs on a wooden chest of drawers, beneath it.

A combination of eras, in your home, is all about experimentation. Yet, with a bit of luck, you can also chance upon customized furniture packages Miami that make your task easy.

 

With its elegant decor based patinas, furniture and unusual objects unearthed in the region, ” Gustave  “is a small house of the sixteenth century, in the walled city of Belleme, transformed into a delightful tea room, deli and curio shop.  Read the original article at Magazine e-magDECO 

Raphael and his dog Donut.

Sébastien and Raphael Llado Levavasseur
18 rue Ville Close, 61130 Bellême
Telephone: 00 33 (0) 2 33 73 94 89
Website: http://www.maison-gustave.fr/

A Louis XV Style Gilt Metal Mounted Painted Side Table

At the entrance of the teahouse is the deli.  Two-body Swedish early nineteenth Lisa Martino “The House Fassier” display and confectioner Louis XV style chair XIXth “Stephanie Mayeux Antiques”.

Petite Antique French Lady’s Writing Desk w/Orig. Tooled Leather

Provence Style Chest –Benjamin Wilson Antiques

Distressed paneling sits behind a Louis XVI style caned seat

Portrait of Lord Swedish Lisa Martino 

 Gustavian clock with a Louis XV style hunting table, with a  Caned Louis XVI style bench


Pair of Louis XV Painted and Parcel Gilt Chaises a la Reine

A fruitwood table -Louis XV period

A Pair of Louis XV Style Fauteuils

Provence Style Chest Greenwich Living Antiques & Design Center

A 19th Century French Carved and Painted Provincial 3 Tier Table

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Breathtaking French Provincial Office Furniture

French Secretary Tiered Desk – GBP 4,295.00 by Sweetpea & Willow

In many homes, space is at a premium so many home owners need to think strategically about how to best use the space they have available.   The dining room is a great option for a space that can double as a home office, while at the same time functioning as an area to eat.  In many modern homes, the dining room is left unused, so why not turn it into an area that functions for a secondary business?  In some homes, space is very limited after the kids all get their own rooms, so family rooms need to be thought out.

If you’re thinking about using your dining room in this way, then consider investing in a secretary desk, which can hold a computer, keyboard, which can house all the computer equipment, leaving the dining room table left clean for dinners.  Slant desks are perfect for dining room furniture as they often have  additional cabinet space that could  house extra books and binders for school or business.  At the same time, they close up so you don’t need to see the computer keyboard, and all the mess that everyone has while they are working or studying.  You may also want to get a sideboard that can double up as a filing cabinet.

 

An antique Louis XV desk of rosewood and fruitwood with marquetry inlay and original ormolu and hardware.

Painted open front Biblitheque with barooque bonnet

Rare 18th Louis Xv Century French Oak Desk, Vintage 1950 French Secretary Desk Louis XV

French Provincial Louis XV Painted Chestnut Bibliotheque – This white painted, display cabinet or bookcase displays a moulded cornice above a conforming, paneled case enclosing open shelves, on a plinth base. It offers great display space and storage. Eron Johnson Antiques

This large and impressive French writing desk is hand-painted in antique white and rubbed down considerably to achieve a heavily distressed vintage look. It features four small drawers below four classic pigeon holes. The shapely legs and scalloped underside make this a wonderfully sophisticated piece of French furniture

Louis XV Polychrome Painted Two Part Breakfronted Bibliotheque– A French Louis XV Polychrome Painted Two Part Walnut, Beech and Oak Breakfronted Bibliotheque C1780, the uppermost with molded conforming cornice above the paneled and scrolled sides with a pair of inset screened doors flanked by outer conforming screened doors, each with thumb molded decoration and with arched asymmetrical tops and center panels enclosing shelves, above a base section with four solid arched panel doors on a plinth base.


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36 French Landscaping Looks For Your Back Yard

French style decorating has become so popular because of beauty of the the old world looks that are associated with the style.  There are a couple of elements that you can incorporate into your landscaping and the type of furniture you choose which will give you the classic French looks found in Provence.

1.  Consider replacing your lawn with gravel.  It sounds like a bad idea right?  Create texture using raised garden beds, and add in patio furniture, water gardens, which adds a lot more texture than just plain grass.

Consider showcasing the lawn that you do have.  If you have rectangular backyard, consider cutting around your lawn, forming a circle shape in the center of your property. A circular or square pattern which you can edge with stone or coordinating greenery can give you more of a designer look.

2.  Add In Rustic Container Gardens- Garden style urns can really capture the old world romance that you see in Versailles.  Paint can do wonders to those new resin urns that you see at home depot.  To get a rustic look, start with painting your urn an oil paint in flat black.  After it dries, mix together sand and brown paint and apply it to the urn.  When it is almost dry, take the hose, and spray water on the urn.  The pressure of the water will create a natural distressed effect that doesn’t look like you painted it yourself.  Consider using this picture as your inspiration.

3. Create Order In Your Backyard- Pair common elements together to create a landscape that looks like it was designed by the pros.  Plant fruit trees, instead of regular trees that will mature and produce dozens of fruit from year to year.  Line up urns, and patio chairs along the edges.  Line up shrubs and hedges in a row to draw special attention to these selected areas.

4. Consider investing in metal furniture that you don’t have to shelter over the winter.  Having a large yard is a lot of maintenance.  Wood furniture over time can root if it is left in the snow, while metal furniture, does a lot better in winter conditions. If you can shelter your furniture, do!  If you cannot, purchase clear plastic shower curtains at your local dollar store to drape over some of your furniture.  Wood, and metal furniture can be touched up with paint from year to year.

5.  Folding outdoor furniture is really popular in France.  Consider investing in a set of folding chairs which you can paint.  Any sort of metal furniture will create the French mood you are after.  Don’t worry if the furniture you choose is vintage, as anything can be improved with paint.  Metal garden pots, posts, fences, chairs are all elements that are commonly seen in the French countryside.  You cannot go wrong with anything metal in your back yard if you are after the French look.

 

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